Posted by: Blog Admin | August 1, 2012

CPR & AED Laws Adopted By State

Bill SigningGov. Bev Perdue signed House Bills 837 and 914, Thursday, July 26, 2012, that will save lives in North Carolina.  House Bill 837 requires high school students to learn Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and the Heimlich maneuver, as well as pass a test showing that they are proficient in both. The bill will become effective for the Class of 2015, and they must pass the test to graduate.

House Bill 914 requires an Automated External Defibrillator in every state owned building, and staff to be trained in how to use it.  “These two bills underscore the huge importance of CPR and AEDs for the safety of the public,” said Wake EMS Public Information Officer Jeff Hammerstein. “Ensuring all high school students get this training, and setting the example of having AEDs in all State buildings will further create a culture that is trained and willing to provide emergency cardiac arrest care in those critical minutes before emergency help arrives”

Wake EMS’ 100 day campaign is centered on teaching the value and importance of AEDs and CPR. The point is to make people less afraid of hurting someone or being liable for any poor outcomes, to make it easy to shop for and purchase an AED and get training and to register the AEDs so that information on the exact location of the AED can be given directly to 9-1-1 callers when they need them most – during an emergency.

This is particularly pertinent to the Wake County EMS System. Over the last decade Wake County has lead the dramatic development of the most successful cardiac arrest outcomes in emergency medical systems, yet we’ve been able to have those successes in a community of relatively low bystander CPR rates.

Increasing bystander CPR and public access to AEDs may be one of the most important areas of focus for further increasing success rates and making sure no one dies from cardiac arrest unnecessarily.

 

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